One of the most influential figures in California organic agriculture: Amigo Bob Cantisano, 1951-2020

One of the most influential figures in California organic agriculture, Amigo Bob Cantisano passed away in December 2020.

From UC Santa Cruz: "A lively narrator with vivid recollections of many significant chapters and characters in the history of California organic culture and agriculture, Amigo Bob Cantisano has countless stories to tell. Sarah Rabkin interviewed him on April 7th and 9th, 2008, in the farmhouse kitchen of his Heaven and Earth Farm, located on the San Juan Ridge in California’s Sierra Nevada foothills, north of Nevada City."

https://library.ucsc.edu/reg-hist/amigo-bob-cantisano-organic-farming-advisor-founder-ecological-farming-conference

Transcript and full audio. University of California Escholarship Site. Audio may be accessed using the "Supporting Material" tab at the bottom left of the page.":

https://escholarship.org/uc/item/98z5t9df#main

https://escholarship.org/uc/item/98z5t9df#supplemental

From The Union newspaper: Amigo Bob Cantisano, 69, an early pioneer of the organic farming movement whose accomplishments have been featured in National Geographic and the New York Times, died Saturday after an eight-year battle with head and neck cancer. "Cantisano wanted to have his body composted in the world’s first human composting facility, just opened for business this month, Bliss said. Cantisano’s family is accepting donations to help cover the costs with a GoFundMe page and the resulting cubic yard of compost should be ready for pick-up in roughly a month."

https://www.theunion.com/news/organic-farming-pioneer-amigo-bob-cantisano-dies/

From LA Times: "Near the end of his life, Cantisano expressed frustration that organic farming was still only a small slice of agriculture — even as environmental threats increased. But he was never consumed by the disappointment. He liked to swim in lakes and rivers and hike in the Sierra and dance.
“Amigo was about adding life, whether it was microbes in the soil or turning up the music,” Earnshaw said. “He always said perseverance and diligence are the key to getting things to change. And lately I’ve been thinking he was talking about more than farming.”

https://www.latimes.com/california/story/2020-12-29/amigo-bob-cantisano-organic-farming-movement-dies-at-69



Demand for avocados increases by 30% per year but that comes at a heavy environmental impact

Avocado cultivation has dramatic consequences and has been linked to water shortages, human rights violations and an environmentally damage. It takes 1,000 liters of water to produce 1 kg of avocado fruit.

The demand for avocados increases by 30% per year but that comes at a heavy environmental impact. 

DW Documentary:


Growing Jackfruit in South Florida - UF/IFAS Extension Miami-Dade video lecture

The UF/IFAS Tropical Fruit Extension agent for Miami-Dade County, Jeff Wasielewski, teaches you how to grow jackfruit in South Florida. This is part of the Tropical Fruit Tuesdays webinar series.

 

How to make a green burrito with bele as the wrap, large leaf edible hibiscus

How to make a burrito with bele as the wrap, large leaf edible hibiscus. Lau Pele Wraps from Hawaii: 

 

See more here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3upgRdecLU4

Suggested filling for the burrito:

- cranberry hibiscus
- leeks
- young moringa leaves
- young mulberry leaves
- bidens alba leaves
- turmeric
- hummus
- tabasco sauce

Available for purchase: Kiko's Crump TM South Sea Salad Tree AKA bele Tree - Abelmoschus manihot

https://wellspringgardens.com/products/kikos-crump-tm-south-sea-salad-tree-abelmoschus-manihot

How to propagate bele, large leaf edible hibiscus, from a cutting

From the Philippines: "Bele plant (Hibiscus manihot) - which is also known as aibika, slippery cabbage, Abelmoschus Manihot, Tonga Spinach and sunset hibiscus. This is edible plants or vegetables that easily grow in the Asian countries specially here in the Philippines. We grow it by cuttings and it will be harvest 2- 3 months from the day we planted."

From Hawaii:

Available for purchase:

https://wellspringgardens.com/products/kikos-crump-tm-south-sea-salad-tree-abelmoschus-manihot

Top Plants for a Food Garden in Subtropical Climates

From Rob Greenfield: Pete Kanaris's 10 top plants for a food garden in subtropical climates - Florida gardening.

1. Chaya (Cnidoscolus aconitifolius)
2. Moringa (Moringa oleifera)
3. Yuca / cassava (Manihot esculenta)
4. Sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas)
5. Sissoo / Miami / Brazilian spinach (Alternanthera sissoo)
6. Katuk (Sauropus androgynus)
7. Papaya (Carica papaya)
8. Edible leaf hibiscus (Abelmoschus manihot)
9. Cranberry hibiscus (Hibiscus acetosella)
10. Okinawa spinach (Gynura crepioides)

Plants available for purchase from Pete’s nursery by visit or by mail.
Details here: https://www.greendreamsfl.com/