"Food gardening is the most intelligent adult endeavor on earth and ought to be understood by anyone who eats. You eat healthier, fresher, tastier food, enjoy gentle exercise, and make new friends." Source: http://amzn.to/RpbdJx

What to grow year-round in South Florida

Here are some vegetables that do amazingly well even in the blazing heat and humidity of the tropical summer in South Florida: Malabar SpinachMoringa TreeOkinawa SpinachChaya Tree Spinach, ChardOkra, Katuk, Cranberry hibiscus, Eggplant.

A list of some South Florida edibles: Acerola (Barbados) and Surinam cherry, Avocado, Banana, Carambola (star fruit), Cecropia, Cinnamon, Citrus, Coconut, Coffee, Grapes - muscadine, Guava, Hog plum, Jackfruit, June plum, Katuk, Lychee, Malay apple, Mango, Moringa, Nutmeg, Papaya, Passionfruit, Plantain, Purple mombin, Rambutan, Soursop, Star apple, Sugar apple, Tamarind, Wax apple.

Try sub-irrigated planters (SIPs) outdoors and Kratky off-the-grid hydroponics outdoors or indoors.



3 vegetable growing systems based on living arrangement (click on the link for a larger image).



"How to grow" guides for specific vegetables

How to Grow Tomatoes

How to Grow Peppers

How to Grow Cucumbers in Containers

How to Grow Lettuce

How to Grow Collard Greens (Collards)

How to Grow Radishes

How to Grow Garlic

How to Grow Cilantro

How to Grow Swiss Chard

Tools

Organic fertilizers to use in your home garden

Raised Garden Bed from Costco

Raised Garden Bed: What soil to select?

Grow Box - Sub-irrigated planter (SIP) by Garden Patch vs. EarthBox - sub-irrigated planter, garden container for vegetables

How to repel animals from your vegetable garden? Use pepper/garlic spray

Portable walk-in greenhouse http://goo.gl/TKCis

References

Container Gardening - Growing Your Greens - YouTube http://bit.ly/1woBV6T

A Crop-by-Crop Guide to Growing Organic Vegetables and Fruits - MOTHER EARTH NEWS http://buff.ly/1qfvlOR

The Cooperative Extension Search engines searches a good number of university agricultural extension websites: http://www.extension.org/search

How to Grow - Bonnie Plants http://bit.ly/YGLCZN

Advice / Royal Horticultural Society http://goo.gl/gI44k

Useful Gardening Websites and Resources http://bit.ly/Mn8HLp

What Vegetables Should I Grow in My Garden? http://bit.ly/Mn8Kqz

Square Foot Gardening

Pots2Plots - How to grow vegetables, herbs, fruit and edible flowers http://goo.gl/QIlAR

Tropical fruit trees tolerant to flooding

Here are the tropical fruit trees that are tolerant to flooding according to University of Florida:

Tolerant to flooding:
Guava
Sapodilla
Caimito
Coconut
Grafted citrus

Moderately tolerant to flooding:
Lychee and Longan
‘Tahiti’ lime
Canistel
Mango
Carambola
Banana

Not tolerant to flooding:
Avocado
Papaya
Mamey sapote
Sugar apple and Atemoya
Passion fruit
Jackfruit

Sapodilla is among the very few trees that are tolerant to both flooding and drought.

References:
http://www.growables.org/information/documents/DroughtFlood.pdf

Mamey sapote has a sweet, almond-like, unique flavor

The pulp has a sweet, almond-like, unique flavor.

Different cultivars produce at different times of the year and planting of 3-4 cultivars may suffice to have mature fruit year-round (e.g., 'Tazumal', 'Pace', 'Magana', and 'Pantin'):

- 'Tazumal', season Jan.-Feb., Good flavor, Medium tree, High yield

- Pace', season Mar.-Apr., Excellent flavor, Tall tree, High yield, Precocious!

- 'Magana' - season April-May, Good flavor, Small/slow growing tree, High yield. Precocious!

- 'Pantin' (Key West), season July-Aug, Excellent flavor, Tall tree, Medium yield

- 'Abuelo', season Oct.-Nov., Excellent flavor, Spreading tree, Medium flavor

- Florida', season Mar.-Apr., Good flavor, Tall tree, High yield

Mamey Sapote with The Tropical Fruit Growers of South Florida (video):



References:

FC30/MG331: Mamey Sapote Growing in the Florida Home Landscape http://buff.ly/2ncz1RF
http://www.tropicalfruitnursery.com/fruitproducts_m.htm
'Pace' Mamey Sapote http://buff.ly/2mk8XH2
The Mamey Sapote in South Florida http://buff.ly/2mkdOru
Pouteria sapota, Mamey, Mamey Sapote - http://buff.ly/2mjYEmi
Mamey Sapote http://buff.ly/2mki8Hn

How to Feed and Fertilize a Fruit Tree in the South

From the Vegan Athlete channel:



He fertilizes 3-4 times per year with liquid iron and kelp, each diluted in a 5-gallon bucket of water. Jake Mace lives in Arizona. He mentions products from Amazon but you can probably buy similar products cheaper at your local Lowe's or Home Depot. Links are below.

https://www.amazon.com/Southern-Ag-Chelated-Liquid-128oz/dp/B0053NDZJW/
https://www.amazon.com/Maxicrop-Liquid-Seaweed-Kelp-Extract/dp/B000COBUQC

Lowes:

https://www.lowes.com/pd/Ironite-15-lb-Soil-Conditioner/50260119
https://www.lowes.com/pd/Sunniland-1-Gallon-Organic-Soil-Conditioner/3082949
https://www.lowes.com/pd/Sunniland-40-lb-Organic-Natural-Vegetable-Food-6-4-6/3083855

What fruit trees grow easily in South Florida

What are the fruit trees that grow easily in South Florida? Here is the list:

- mangoes
- sapodillas
- longans - longer fruiting season than lychee
- jackfruit - fruit at age 3-4
- mameys
- tamarinds
- spondias- fruit in June
- carambola - fruit in the first year, year-round

From Jeff Wasielewski:

"You can still buy citrus trees in South Florida. But when you do, you’re likely setting yourself up for failure and eventual disappointment. This is the time to plant other fruit trees – mangoes, sapodillas, longans, jackfruit, mameys, tamarinds, spondias and carambola – that have very few pest and disease problems and can produce fruit with minimal input."

References:

Greetings, Citrus Greening! (Your Tree Is Probably Infected) http://buff.ly/2lFqA1T

Bischofia javanica (Bishop wood) is an invasive tree in Florida

This rapidly growing evergreen or semievergreen tree can reach a height of 75 feet but usually is seen 40 to 50 feet tall in Florida.

The dense rounded crown and thick trunk used to make toog tree a popular shade tree. However, enough light will not penetrate for a lawn to grow underneath toog trees.

There are too many other high quality trees available in USDA hardiness zones 10 and 11 to encourage planting this tree.

Apparently, the fruits can be used in making wine. The seeds, which are reportedly edible, contain 30-54% oil, which is used as a lubricant.

References:

ENH259/ST100: Bischofia javanica: Toog Tree http://buff.ly/2kT4S9i
Bischofia javanica - Wikipedia http://buff.ly/2kT2HCG