How to prevent skin problems while gardening

How to prevent skin problems while gardening - American Academy of Dermatology:

Mango forest around house in Phoenix, Arizona

A mango forest around a house in Phoenix, Arizona:

Food forest plants in South Florida: a complete list of all plants



Food forest plants in South Florida - 7 layers (click here to enlarge the image).

The list is open for edit. Please feel free to add your own comments and suggestions below:

Food forest plants in South Florida: a complete list of all plants



What is a Food Forest? Geoff Lawton: "Forests are ecosystems with a diversity of plants, animals, and fungi. They were designed by nature to have perfect balance. A food forest is a version of this in which the different, balanced components produce food. When we understand how nature creates its ecosystem, we can model that with productive species to produce food sustainably, with minimum inputs for maximum outputs.

Forests have layers. At the top is the (1) canopy layer followed by (2) understory trees, (3) bushes and shrubs, and down to (4) herbaceous layers. Under the ground, there are (5) root yields, and at the surface, there are (6) groundcovers. There are also vertical layers of (7) climbers. These layers work to occupy all the space. In designing a food forest, we use those layers to work for our benefit.

For designed food forests, the plants change from climate to climate. In the subtropics, tamarillo functions as an understory, and also within this layer are productive trees, such as feijoa, guava, and citrus. Taro, coco yam, and cassava are root yields. There are also large herbs, like bananas. The food forest would also include large support species—ice cream bean, tipuana tipu, casuarina—that support the forest by cycling nutrients, as well as understory support trees, a la acacia, leucaena, cassia, and albizzia. Most of these support species will eventually give way to large, productive species: rose apples, mulberries, jackfruit, bunya pine, pecan, and mango. The system remains very stable when all the layers are occupied."

Edible bamboo species

The 4 bamboo genera used for edible bamboo shoots are:

- Phyllostachys
- Bambusa
- Arundinaria
- Dendrocalamus

Some species of Phyllostachys are even called Phyllostachys edulis, which means edible.

Shoots of several species of bamboo are harvested for consumption:

- Phyllostachys edulis produces very large shoots up to 2.5 kilos. The shoots of this species are called different names depending on when they are harvested. Winter shoots are smaller in size, up to 1 kg in weigh per harvested shoot. The flesh is tender and palatable and commercially quite important; they are harvested in November and December in Taiwan. "Hairy" shoots are larger in size, but due to their toughness and bitter taste, they are generally used to make dried bamboo shoots. They are harvested between March and May in Taiwan.

- Phyllostachys bambusoides produces shoots that are slender and long with firm flesh. Commonly consumed fresh, they are also made into dried bamboo shoots.

Other Phyllostachys: dulcis ("sweet shoot"), nigra ("giant gray"), nuda.

- Bambusa oldhamii produces valuable shoots that are large with tender and fragrant flesh. They are usually sold fresh and in season between late spring and early fall. Their availability depends on local climate. These shoot are also available in cans when not in season.

- Bambusa odashimae is considered similar to B. oldhamii, but highly prized due to its crisp flesh similar to Asian pears. It is produced mainly in Taitung and Hualien and consumed fresh.

- Fargesia spathacea produces flavourful long, thin, tender sprouts that can be eaten fresh or canned.

- Dendrocalamus latiflorus produces shoots that are large with flesh that is fibrous and hard. As such, they are suitable mainly for canning and drying.

Pelton's Nursery is a good source of bamboo in Miami, it's on Eureka Drive:

Available bamboos:

Slender Weaver's (Texilis Gracilis)
Golden Goddness (Bambusa Multiplex)
Tropical Black (Gigantochloa Atroviolacea)
Bamboo Grass (Pogonatherum)
Golden Hawaiian (Bambusa Vulgaris "Vittata")
Buddah Belly (Bambusa Vulgaris "Wamin")
Black Bamboo (Bambusa Lako)
Blue Bamboo (Bambua Chungii)
Oldham Bamboo (Bambusa Oldhamii)
Common Green (Bambusa Vulgaris)
Angel Mis Bamboo (Dendrocalamus Minor Amoenus)

References:

https://www.ctahr.hawaii.edu/oc/freepubs/pdf/L-14.pdf
https://www.ctahr.hawaii.edu/oc/freepubs/pdf/OF-18.pdf
http://extension.uga.edu/publications/detail.html?number=B1357&title=Growing%20Bamboo%20in%20Georgia#food
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bamboo_shoot
https://lewisbamboo.com/edible-bamboo-species/
https://lewisbamboo.com/product/nuda/
https://lewisbamboo.com/product/giant-gray/
https://bamboonursery.com/edible-bamboo/

Pelton's Nursery:
https://www.yelp.com/biz/peltons-nurseries-miami-2
https://www.peltonpalmsbamboo.com/about-us

Free plant cuttings (and other propagation materials) can be obtained from the U.S. government

Germplasm Distribution Policies & Procedures

It is the policy of the National Plant Germplasm System (NPGS) to provide small quantities of available germplasm to research and educational isntitutions for research, testing and scientific breeding efforts that require genetic diversity or specific genetic standards.

Almost all plant material from the Davis gene bank is distributed as cuttings and deadlines for orders are those appropriate for such cuttings. These cuttings must be rooted or grafted/budded to produce a plant. Material of Juglans, Pistacia, Diospyros and most Prunus are very difficult to root and the recipient must obtain appropriate rootstocks prior to receipt of scion cuttings.

The National Plant Germplasm System (NPGS) website is here:

https://npgsweb.ars-grin.gov/gringlobal/search.aspx

As of 2017, most of the requested by the public are refused: Federally funded agricultural gene banks work to safeguard crop diversity and provide seeds and cuttings for research, breeding, and education. But too many public requests are hindering their work. More info is here:

https://civileats.com/2017/04/27/public-demand-is-overwhelming-gene-banks-public-service/

References:

https://www.ars.usda.gov/pacific-west-area/davis-ca/natl-clonal-germplasm-rep-tree-fruit-nut-crops-grapes/docs/services/
https://billyandanuttama.wordpress.com/2010/08/21/how-to-get-free-seeds-from-the-government-seed-bank/
https://www.suburbanhobbyfarmer.com/free-seeds-government/
https://www.suburbanhobbyfarmer.com/rare-seeds-u-s-government/
https://civileats.com/2017/04/27/public-demand-is-overwhelming-gene-banks-public-service/

Little things you can do in your everyday life in order to have a more sustainable lifestyle - BBC

Maddie Moate looks at the little things you can do in your everyday life in order to have a more sustainable lifestyle, from growing your own food to create fertiliser with your waste:



Fish Poo and LED Lights. Is this the future of food?! -- BBC:

Cape Gooseberry

From RareSeeds: The Cape Gooseberry goes by many names: "goldenberry" in the U.S. and U.K., "poha" in Hawaii, "jam fruit" in India.